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Computer Science and ICT

COMPUTER SCIENCE

As digital technologies become increasingly entrenched into our world, the conversation surrounding when and how to teach Computer Science is becoming increasingly important. Computer Science became once again an important subject in the national curriculum in 2014. The need to update our technology as it changes is paramount. The Computer Science Department is staffed by two highly qualified teachers who teach across the year groups and are specialists in the subject area. They are well resourced, successful and motivated. The Computer Science Department encourages pupils in their care to realise that making mistakes in computational tasks is key to success, and particularly in programming.

 

key stage 3 overview 

The department aims by the end of Key Stage 3 all pupils are able to use a variety of computational skills confidentially, securely, creatively and independently.

Pupils at St Gregory’s will have their own user area on the network. The school’s network allows internet access that has a filter, which helps to safeguard unwanted materials being accessed either knowingly or accidentally.

year 7 

  • 7.1 - Hardware & Software
    • understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • 7.2 - E-Safety
    • Computational e-safety
    • Social e-safety
      • understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns
  • 7.3 - Fundamentals of Algorithms
    • Introduction to Algorithms
    • Flowcharts and understanding algorithms
    • Producing algorithms
    • Developing fundamental algorithms
  • 7.4 - Fundamentals of Programming
    • Linking algorithms and programming
    • Introduction to programming
    • Producing fundamental programs
    • Developing fundamental programs

Useful Links:

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zvc9q6f
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/z8mtsbk
http://teach-ict.com

year 8 

  • 8.1 – Algorithms
    • Building from fundamental algorithms
    • Solving problems using algorithms
    • Developing efficient algorithms
  • 8.2 - Computational Mathematics
    • Introduction to Computational Mathematics
    • Number systems and conversions
    • ASCII and encoding text
  • 8.3 - Programming
    • Building from fundamental programs
    • Building programs that meet a specification
    • Developing efficient programs
    • Testing and evaluating programs
  • 8.4 - Social Computing
    • How computers work in the real world
    • Representing text, picture, video and sound
    • Y8 – Project
      • understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits
      • design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems

Useful Links:

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zvc9q6f
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/z8mtsbk
http://teach-ict.com

year 9 

  • 9.1 - Advanced Algorithms
    • Sorting and searching algorithms
    • Using logical reasoning (Turing)
    • Building advanced algorithms
      • understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem
  • 9.2 - Advanced Programming
    • Developing knowledge of programming languages
    • Data Structures (lists, tables and arrays)
    • Solving complex problems using programs
    • Procedures and functions
    • Developing modular programs
      • use of textual programming language to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions
  • 9.3 - CS Project
    • Introduction to CS Project
    • Introduction to circuit boards and sensors
    • Developing a product based on a specification
    • Testing and evaluation

Useful Links:

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/
https://www.learnpython.org/
https://www.python.org/downloads/
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zvc9q6f
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/z8mtsbk
http://teach-ict.com

key stage 4 overview 

The UK is a world leader in the creative digital industries, such as in the creation of visual effects for films and computer games. However, there is growing recognition that we need to build on and improve the UK’s capability and capacity for technical innovation and creativity in this area.

The UK has a well-deserved reputation for producing innovation and design. In an era in which creativity is intertwining with technology like never before, there is a danger that the UK will fail to nurture the next generation of world class designers.

year 10 

Course title: AQA GCSE Computer Science

This qualification aims to:

  • Understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer Science including abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms, and data representation.
  • Analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs.
  • Think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically.
  • Understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems.
  • Understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society.
  • Apply mathematical skills relevant to Computer Science.

Unit 1: Computational thinking and problem solving

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour and 30 minutes
  • Written paper

 

What's assessed?

Computational thinking, problem solving, code tracing and applied computing as well as theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 1 to 4.

50%
of total
GCSE

Unit 2: Written assessment

  • 80 marks
  • 1 hour and 30 minutes
  • Written paper

What's assessed

Theoretical knowledge from subject content 3 – 7 above.

50%
of total
GCSE

Programming project

  • 40 marks
  • Totalling 20 hours
  • Non-Exam Assessment (NEA)

What's assessed?

The non-exam assessment (NEA) assesses a pupil’s ability to solve a practical programming problem.

0%
of total
GCSE 

Helps understanding of Units 1 & 2

 

Further information: https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/computer-science-and-it/gcse/computer-science-8520

Useful Websites/Information:

https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/z34k7ty
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zqmtsbk
http://www.teach-ict.com/glossary/A.htm
https://www.w3schools.com/
http://myhomework.lgfl.net/
https://members.gcsepod.com/login

Parents can encourage pupils to attend Computing club regularly to obtain additional guidance with coursework. The software used for the projects are Visual Studio, Game Maker 8, Microsoft Office package, Adobe Creative Cloud 2017 and Python.

key stage 5 overview 

It is an exciting time to be a Computer Scientist! We are living in the midst of a revolution powered by computers. This revolution has overtaken all aspects of society. It is a communication revolution, a transportation revolution, a medical revolution, an entertainment revolution. Consider the things one would need to give up to live a day without computers:

  • Social networking: email, IM, Facebook, texting, cell phone, landline phone
  • Transportation: GPS, car, planes, trains
  • Medical systems: electronic health records, nearly all medical tests
  • Commerce: ecommerce, ATMs, credit cards, debit cards

As well as being part of our daily lives, Computer Science is used to solve society's most complex and important problems in areas such as engineering, banking, communication and medicine.  Computer Science A-Level is a creative and wide-ranging course which uses computational thinking to design and build systems that work.

Course entry requirements

You will need to have a grade 7 and above in Mathematics GCSE, interest in theory and practical work and preparedness to practise for regular tests.

year 12 

Course title:  A-Level Computer Science

This A-Level can help lead to a wide range of degrees at university including: Computer Science, Software Engineering, Mathematics, Engineering, Information Systems, Computer Security, Game Development and other sciences.

Year 12 subject content

  1. Fundamentals of programming
  2. Fundamentals of data structures
  3. Systematic approach to problem solving
  4. Theory of computation
  5. Fundamentals of data representation
  6. Fundamentals of computer systems
  7. Fundamentals of computer organisation and architecture
  8. Consequences of uses of computing
  9. Fundamentals of communication and networking

 

Year 12 Assessments

Paper 1

Paper 2

What is assessed?

This paper tests a student's ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 1 – 4 above.

What is assessed?

This paper tests a student's ability to answer questions from subject content 5 – 9 above.

Assessed

  • On-screen exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
  • 50% of Year 12

Assessed

  • Written exam: 1 hour 30 minutes
  • 50% of Year 12

Questions

Students answer a series of short questions and write/adapt/extend programs in an electronic answer document provided by us.

We will issue preliminary material, a skeleton program (available in each of the programming languages) and, where appropriate, test data, for use in the exam.

Questions

A series of short-answer and extended-answer questions.

 

Useful Websites/Information:

http://myhomework.lgfl.net/
http://www.teach-ict.com/asa2home.htm

Year 13 

Course title:  A-Level Computer Science

This A-Level can help lead to a wide range of degrees at university including: Computer Science, Software Engineering, Mathematics, Engineering, Information Systems, Computer Security, Game Development and other sciences.

A-Level subject content

10. Fundamentals of programming
11. Fundamentals of data structures
12. Fundamentals of algorithms
13. Theory of computation
14. Fundamentals of data representation
15. Fundamentals of computer systems
16. Fundamentals of computer organisation and architecture
17. Consequences of uses of computing
18. Fundamentals of communication and networking
19. Fundamentals of databases
20. Big Data
21. Fundamentals of functional programming
22. Systematic approach to problem solving
23. Non-exam assessment – the computing practical project

 

A-Level Assessments

Paper 1

Paper 2

Non-exam Assessment

What is assessed?

This paper tests a student's ability to program, as well as their theoretical knowledge of computer science from subject content 10 – 13 above and the skills required from section 22 above.

What is assessed?

This paper tests a student's ability to answer questions from subject content 14 – 21 above.

What is assessed?

The non-exam assessment assesses student's ability to use the knowledge and skills gained through the course to solve or investigate a practical problem. Students will be expected to follow a systematic approach to problem solving, as shown in section 22 above.

Assessed

  • On-screen exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

Assessed

  • Written exam: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • 40% of A-level

Assessed

  • 75 marks
  • 20% of A-Level

Questions

Students answer a series of short questions and write/adapt/extend programs in an electronic answer document provided by us. We will issue preliminary material, a skeleton program (available in each of the programming languages) and, where appropriate, test data, for use in the exam.

Questions

Compulsory short-answer and extended-answer questions.

Undertakes Computer Science  project.

 

 

Useful Websites/Information:

http://myhomework.lgfl.net/
http://www.teach-ict.com/asa2home.htm

 

 

ICT

Pupils are prepared for a world in which IT is seen as a natural part. Every child leaves able to use ICT efficiently and effectively at an appropriate level. Pupils are aware of the dangers associated with the development in the industry and their E-Safety. Pupils understand what is meant by programming and have a basic knowledge of coding and algorithms. Curricular and extra-curricular activities that enhance learning and enjoyment of the discipline. Pupils are aware of the possibilities created by the developments within the industry. Pupils have an understanding of careers and opportunities in Computer Science and ICT related jobs.

 

key stage 4 overview 

The UK is a world leader in the creative digital industries, such as in the creation of visual effects for films and computer games. However, there is growing recognition that we need to build on and improve the UK’s capability and capacity for technical innovation and creativity in this area.

The UK has a well-deserved reputation for producing innovation and design. In an era in which creativity is intertwining with technology like never before, there is a danger that the UK will fail to nurture the next generation of world class designers.

year 11 

Course title: Pearson Edexcel Level 2 Certificate in Digital Applications (CiDA)

The Pearson Edexcel Level 2 Certificate in Digital Applications has been designed to engage and enthuse young people with an interest in creative computing, for example digital graphics and animations, interactive multimedia products and computer games. Our aim is to encourage pupils to consider pursuing education, training and career paths which will contribute to the nation’s economic wellbeing, while achieving job satisfaction and reward.

The Pearson Edexcel Level 2 Certificate in Digital Applications (CiDA) is taught over 2 academic years and comprises of two units. Unit 1 is a mandatory practical examination and pupils then have the option of choosing one of the three optional project units.

  • Unit 1 - Developing Web Products
  • Unit 4 - Game Making

 

Useful Websites/Information:

https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/z34k7ty
https://www.bbc.com/education/subjects/zqmtsbk
http://www.teach-ict.com/glossary/A.htm
https://www.w3schools.com/
http://myhomework.lgfl.net/
https://members.gcsepod.com/login

Parents can encourage pupils to attend Computing club regularly to obtain additional guidance with coursework. The software used for the projects are Maker 8, Microsoft Office package and Adobe Creative Cloud 2017.

key stage 5  overview 

OCR Cambridge Technicals are aimed at pupils who have completed Key Stage 4 of their education and want to study in a more practical, work-related way. The Cambridge Technicals in IT take an in-depth look at IT that’s all around us, providing pupils with a theoretical background reinforced with skills that transfer into the modern workplace.

All units covered are engaging, fit for purpose and suitable for the needs of pupils and industry. The units have been designed with consultation with universities, employers and industry specialists to make sure that pupils will gain the right combination of knowledge, understanding and skills required for the 21st century.

The qualifications aim to develop pupils’ knowledge, understanding and skills of the principles of IT and Global Information Systems. Pupils will gain an insight into the IT sector as they investigate the pace of technological change, IT infrastructure, flow of information on a global scale, and the importance of legal and security considerations. Designed in collaboration with experts spanning the breadth of the sector, the Level 3 Cambridge Technicals in IT focus on the requirements that today’s universities and employers demand.

Will develop pupil’s ability to:

  • Think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
  • See relationships between different aspects of the subject
  • Be aware of emerging technologies and appreciate their potential impact on society
  • Apply skills in and an understanding of computing (including programming) in a range of contexts to solve problems
  • Through the creation of a Programming Project, students will have the opportunity to create a substantial piece of software using modern design methods and, guided by teachers, they will look to display their skills and talents.

year 12 

Course title: OCR Level 3 Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in IT (2016 suite)

This qualification is designed for pupils that want to continue from KS4 through to applied learning by developing their knowledge and understanding of the principles of IT and global information systems. Achievement of this qualification can support progression to go on and study relevant IT degrees in a Higher Education institution such as, Computing and IT, Computing Science, Software Developments, Software Engineering, ICT and Computer Networks or Business Information Systems.

For this qualification, pupils must achieve five units, three mandatory units and two optional units. The mandatory unit 1, 2 and 3 contributes to 66.6% of the qualification grade.

Mandatory written examinations:

  • Unit 1 - Fundamentals of IT
  • Unit 2 - Global information
  • Unit 3 - Cyber security

Pick two optional projects from:

  • Unit 8 - Project management
  • Unit 9 - Product development
  • Unit 11 - System analysis and design
  • Unit 17 - Internet of Everything

Further reading: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-education-and-skills/cambridge-technicals-it-level-3-certificate-extended-certificate-introductory-diploma-foundation-diploma-diploma-05838-05842-2016-suite/

 

Useful Websites/Information:

http://myhomework.lgfl.net/
http://www.teach-ict.com/asa2home.htm

OCR Cambridge Technicals provide a strong base for progression to university, apprenticeships or work and are recognised for UCAS tariff points.

year 13 

Course title: OCR Level 3 Cambridge Technical Extended Certificate in IT (2016 suite)

This qualification is designed for pupils that want to continue from KS4 through to applied learning by developing their knowledge and understanding of the principles of IT and global information systems. Achievement of this qualification can support progression to go on and study relevant IT degrees in a Higher Education institution such as, Computing and IT, Computing Science, Software Developments, Software Engineering, ICT and Computer Networks or Business Information Systems.

For this qualification, pupils must achieve five units, three mandatory units and two optional units. The mandatory unit 1, 2 and 3 contributes to 66.6% of the qualification grade.

Mandatory written examinations:

  • Unit 1 - Fundamentals of IT
  • Unit 2 - Global information
  • Unit 3 - Cyber security

Pick two optional projects from:

  • Unit 8 - Project management
  • Unit 9 - Product development
  • Unit 11 - System analysis and design
  • Unit 17 - Internet of Everything

Further reading: http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-education-and-skills/cambridge-technicals-it-level-3-certificate-extended-certificate-introductory-diploma-foundation-diploma-diploma-05838-05842-2016-suite/

 

Useful Websites/Information:

http://myhomework.lgfl.net/

http://www.teach-ict.com/asa2home.htm

OCR Cambridge Technicals provide a strong base for progression to university, apprenticeships or work and are recognised for UCAS tariff points.