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Citizenship Studies

Welcome to the Citizenship Studies homepage. We hope that you are able to access lots of information about the work that we are doing within our department, but please feel free to contact us with any additional questions that you may have.

Teaching Staff

Miss Togher, Mrs Moran, Miss McCarthy and Mrs Sylvester.

KEY STAGE 4 OVERVIEW 

Citizenship studies is a GCSE qualification and is made up of a combination of Exam (40%) and Controlled Assessment (60%).

Within the Citizenship department we aim to empower our students to make their own decisions and to take responsibility for their own lives and communities whilst also allowing our students the opportunity to explore their social and political views. The educational minister says that Citizenship is becoming a cornerstone subject in our education system, allowing our students the opportunity in becoming good global citizens. As a Catholic school we feel that Citizenship is also very beneficial for our students as it helps them to work towards the common good by organising project work on behalf of their chosen charities.

2014 Results
98% A* - C

How can I help my son/daughter in Citizenship?

Useful Links

Overview of the course:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/citizenship/gcse/citizenship-studies-4105

Past Papers and Mark Schemes: http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/citizenship/gcse/citizenship-studies-4105/past-papers-and-mark-schemes

http://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/
www.multicultural.co.uk/multiculturalondon.htm
http://www.adviceguide.org.uk/
http://www.direct.gov.uk/
http://www.unitetheunion.org/
http://www.iarf.net/
http://www.echr.coe.int/
http://www.hrw.org/
http://www.amnesty.org.uk/
http://www.echr.coe.int/echr/Homepage_EN

What to watch:

 The News

 BBC1: ‘The Big Question’, Sundays 10am

 BBC1: ‘Question Time’, Thursdays 10.15pm

What to read:
My Revision Notes: AQA GCSE Citizenship Studies Textbook

Two BBC news reports provide helpful starting points. ‘So what exactly is multiculturalism?’ can be found at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3600791.stm
and a survey on public attitudes to multiculturalism, ‘UK majority back multiculturalism’, can be found at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4137990.stm

Local and national newspapers

What to do:

The best thing for pupils to do is to discuss the topics they have studied and the issues raised in class, outside of school with family and friends. We encourage debate so that pupils can learn to understand, criticise and evaluate the views of others, as well as learning to justify their own arguments.

 

GCSE: AQA Citizenship Studies (Full Course) (4107)

Unit 1 (41051)Citizenship Studies

Written Paper

1 hour

Compulsory short and source-based questions on Theme 1.

Choice of one question from three, based on each of Themes 2 and 3.

20%
Possible 40 marks

Unit 2 (41052)
Advocacy and Representation

Controlled Assessment
20 – 25 hours

30%
Possible 60 marks

Unit 3 (41053)Citizenship Studies

Written Paper

1 hour

Compulsory source-based questions on all four themes.

Choice of one question from three, based on each of Themes 2 and 3.

20%

Possible 40 marks

Unit 4 (41054)
Taking Informed and Responsible Action

Controlled Assessment

20 – 25 hours

30%

Possible 60 marks

 YEAR 10

Students have 5 Citizenship lessons across 2 weeks and lessons are a combination of exam topics and controlled assessment completion.

Homework is set weekly and will often include: preparation for controlled assessment, work related to the current topic, wider reading and practice examination style questions.

Course Content

During Year 10 our pupils cover Unit 1 and Unit 2. Please find details of these below.

 

Unit 1: Citizenship Studies

20% Exam Assessed

This unit covers three themes over the course of the year. Once each topic is completed all pupils will sit a practice exam to test their knowledge and understanding.

Theme 1: Community Action and Active Citizenship

Key Terms

Key Questions

Case Studies

 

  • Active Citizen
  • Pressure Groups
  • Direct Action
  • Indirect Action
  • Target Groups
  • Community Groups
  • Voluntary Groups
  • Charity
  • Rights and Responsibilities
  • Equal Opportunities
  • Health and Safety
  • Consumer

 

  • How can citizens make a difference in society?
  • Which types of action are most effective?
  • What type of groups make up our community?
  • Who holds the most power in the UK?
  • How can people stay safe at work?
  • What are our rights and responsibilities as a citizen?
  • What factors hinder ‘equal opportunities’?

 

  • Fathers for Justice
  • Greenpeace
  • Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement
  • The Suffragettes and the fight for women’s vote

 

Theme 2: Being a Citizen in the UK

Key Terms

Key Questions

Case Studies

 

  • Parliament
  • Government
  • Political Party
  • Democracy
  • Voting
  • Diversity
  • Britishness
  • Prejudice
  • Discrimination
  • Stereotype
  • Labelling
  • Tolerance
  • Multi-cultural
  • Shared values
  • Migration
  • Immigration

 

  • Who makes up central government?
  • Should voting be compulsory?
  • Should under 16’s have the opportunity to vote?
  • Why is it important to be tolerant?
  • In what ways is Britain a tolerant society?
  • How does ethnic, religious and cultural identity affect communities?
  • How does the government help to reduce discrimination?

 

 

  • Notting Hill Carnival

 

  • St Patrick’s Day London Parade

 

  • Local Diwali celebrations

 

Theme 3: Fairness and Justice

Key Terms

Key Questions

Case Studies

 

  • Fairness
  • Justice
  • Human Law
  • Civil Law
  • Criminal Law
  • County Court
  • Magistrates Court
  • Free Press
  • Media

 

 

  • What are the ways in which justice is served in Britain?
  • How is justice brought when the law is broken?
  • What are the different types of law?
  • Why are there different types of courts?
  • What differences are there in law for younger people?
  • What are the positives and negatives of having a free press?
  • How can the media help to change the law?

 

  • James Bulger Murder Trial

 

 

 

 

Unit 2: Advocacy and Representation

30% Controlled Assessment

This unit encompasses one piece of Controlled Assessment. Pupils will plan, research, organise and evaluate their work. This will all take place in school.

Pupils will work in groups to complete this Controlled Assessment.

They will:

  • Investigate their chosen group.Discover what they do and how they work.
  • Consult or visit the group and perhaps ask a person from the organisation to give a talk.
  • Find out different views about the work of the selected group.
  • Draw conclusions from your research.
  • Present a case to an audience (e.g. younger or older pupils, teachers, people within your community, local councillors).
  • Find out if your advocacy has changed views, attitudes, opinions or intentions.
  • Assess and evaluate the effectiveness of your task.

Some charities that our pupils have advocated include: the NSPCC, Teenage Cancer Trust, The Passage, Make a Wish Foundation, Help for Heroes.

Our pupils have been involved in organising interviews, questionnaires, asking guest speakers to come to school, delivering PSHE lessons, delivering assemblies and many fundraising activities as part of their projects.

 

Charity logos

 YEAR 11

Students have 5 Citizenship lessons across 2 weeks and lessons are a combination of exam topics and controlled assessment completion.

Homework is set weekly and will often include: preparation for controlled assessment, work related to the current topic, wider reading and practice examination style questions.

Course Content

Pupils cover Unit 3 and Unit 4 in Year 11. Please see details of these below.

 

Unit 3: Citizenship Studies

20%: Exam Assessed

Theme 1: Community Action and Active Citizenship

Key Terms

Key Questions

Case Studies

 

  • Active Citizenship              Campaign
  • Media Campaign
  • Trade Unions
  • Government
  • Collective action
  • Sustainable practice
  • Economy
  • Community cohesion

 

  • What does a successful campaign look like?
  • What are the positive and negative aspects of being part of a trade union?
  • What impact does the government have on our lives?
  • Should the media be involved in helping to change laws?

 

 

  • The News of the World and Sarah’s Law

 

  • Blackpool’s changing economy

 

Theme 2: Being an Active Citizen in the UK

Key Terms

Key Questions

Case Studies

 

  • Devolution
  • Democracy
  • Dictatorship
  • Communism
  • Voter Apathy
  • Community Cohesion
  • Racism
  • Migration
  • British Identity

 

 

  • What are the benefits and problems of having devolution within Britain?
  • What types of government are most successful?
  • Why have some citizens become apathetic to voting?
  • What does it mean to have a British identity?
  • How has migration and immigration effect British identity?

 

  • Scottish Vote for independence

 

  • Hitler’s Nazi Germany

 

  • The Suffragettes

 

Theme 3: Fairness and Justice

Key Terms

Key Questions

Case Studies

  • Citizens’ rights and responsibilities
  • Freedom of speech
  • Human rights
  • Civil liberty
  • Consumer rights
  • Equal opportunities
  • ASBO
  • Custody
  • Prison sentence
  • Deterrence
  • Rehabilitation
  • Free Press
  • Fair reporting
  • How are citizen’s lives affected by law?
  • How effective is the criminal justice system?
  • What are he roles of key people and structures in the legal system?
  • What are the purposes and practices of sentencing?
  • To what extent do the media reflect, distort and create opinion?
  • How can politicians use the media to communicate with the public?
  • How can other groups use the media to influence public opinion and those in power?
  • MP expenses scandal

 

  • Young offenders institutions

 

Unit 4: Taking informed and Responsible Action

30% Controlled Assessment

This unit encompasses one piece of Controlled Assessment. Pupils will plan, research, organise and evaluate their work. This will all take place in school.

Pupils will work in groups to complete this Controlled Assessment.

They will:

  • Use your research skills to discover the different kinds of needs in the local, national or global community.
  • Find out how young volunteers can make a difference.
  • Contact your chosen group and discuss the different ways you could help by volunteering.
  • Plan and carry out an activity or activities that could help your chosen group.
  • Assess and evaluate your contribution, the contribution of others and the ways in which you make a difference.

Some projects which our pupils have undertaken include: sending Christmas presents overseas with Operation Christmas Child, Food Bank Collection, sending sleeping bags to the homeless in London, sending pencil cases overseas with Project Pencil case and organising disability awareness training for sixth formers.

 

Charity logos